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Fig.  44  Pellet Type Controlled Air Cleaner
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TM-5-4210-230-14P-1 Aerial Ladder Fire Fighting Truck Manual
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Fig.  50  Cleaning EGRH Valve
ENGINE DIVISION SERVICE MANUAL TM 5-4210-230-14&P-1 idle, cruise, acceleration, etc.).  The valve itself consists of a coil spring, valve and a two-piece outer body which is crimped together.          The     valve     dimensions,     spring     and     internal dimensions    are    such    to    produce    the    desired    air    flow requirements. During   the   periods   of   deceleration   and   idle,   manifold vacuum is high.  The high vacuum overcomes the force of the valve spring and the valve bottoms in the manifold end of the valve  housing.  This  does  not  completely  stop  the  flow  but  it does restrict (Fig.  46). Fig.  46  Plunger Position During Idle or Low Engine Speed When  the  engine  is  accelerated  or  operated  at  constant speed,  intake  manifold  vacuum  is  less  than  at  idle  or  during deceleration.    The  spring  force  is  stronger  than  vacuum  pull during this mode so the valve is forced toward the crankcase end of the valve housing. With the valve in this position, more crankcase vapors flow into the intake manifold (Fig.  47). Fig.  47  Plunger Position During High Engine Speed In the event of a backfire, the valve plunger is forced back and seated against the inlet of the valve body. This   prevents   the   backfire   from   traveling   through   the valve and connecting hose into the crankcase (Fig.  48).  If the backfire was allowed to enter the crankcase, it could ignite the volatile crankcase blow-by gases. Fig.  48  Plunger Position During Backfire or When Engine is “OFF”. 14.   Remove and Check EGR Valve and Clean or Replace, if necessary.  (V-345 and V-392 Engines Only) a. Remove EGR valve from engine. Fig.  49  EGR Valve Test b. Apply   10-12"   vacuum   to   EGR   valve   vacuum   port (upper port of dual diaphragm valve).  As vacuum is applied, valve pintle should move off seat and retract into   valve   housing   (Fig.      49).      If   valve   does   not operate when vacuum is applied, valve is faulty and should be replaced. c. Visually   inspect   valve   for   evidence   of   valve   pintle (plunger)   not   seating   or   deposit   accumulation   on pintle and seat.  Clean CGES-215  Page 27 PRINTED IN UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

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