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Table 4-7.  Conversion - Meters to Feet
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TM-9-254 Gearcase Transfer M548 M548A1 (
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Care of Scribers
TM 9-254 4-8. Types of Scribers. a. Machinist’s  Scribers  (fig.  4-20).    Machinist’s  single  point  pocket-type  scribers  have  a  scriber  point  made  of tempered high grade steel and a handle of steel tubing that is nickel plated  The point is reversible, telescoping into the knurled handle when not in use.  This type scriber usually has a 1/4 or 3/8 inch diameter handle with a point length of 2-3/8 or 2-7/8 inches.  Bent point scribers are usually 8 to 12 inches long with one straight point, and one long or one short bent point.    Some  of  these  scribers  are  threaded  and  can  be  engaged  in  either  end  of  the  handle.    The  long  bent  point  is designed for reaching through holes beyond a lip or ridge. Figure 4-20.  Types of Machinist’s Scribers b. Tungsten  Carbide  Scribers.    These  scribers  are  used  to  lay  out  lines  on  very  hard  materials,  such  as hardened steel and glass.  The scriber point is made of tungsten carbide, a long wearing material, which makes it possible to  scribe  sharp,  well  defined  lines  on  the  hardest  materials.    Some  of  these  scribers  are  used  with  an  extension  in conjunction with a vernier height gage, which allows reverse measurements, to be taken from the top of the bottom side of the gage jaw.  This type scriber is hardened, ground, and lapped to a point so that a line or series of lines may be drawn and spaced as required in laying out of dies, and so forth. 4-9. Using the Scriber. a. Sharpness.  Make sure the point of the scriber is sharp.  To sharpen, rotate the scriber between the thumb and forefinger while moving the point back-and forth on an oilstone. b. Work Surface.  Clean work surfaces of all dirt and oil. c. Steel Rule.  Place a steel rule or straight edge on the work beside the line to be scribed. d. Holding  the  Scriber.    Use  the  fingertips  of  one  hand  to  hold  the  rule  in  position  and  hold  the  scriber  in  the other hand as you would a pencil (fig. 4-21). 4-24

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