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Fig.  11.  Chart Showing Effects of Bleeding
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TM-5-4210-230-14P-1 Aerial Ladder Fire Fighting Truck Manual
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The next three steps apply only to the hot patch method.
TRUCK SERVICE MANUAL TM 5-4210-230-14&P-1 WHEELS, RIMS, TIRES SPEEDS Excessive speed is definitely one of the most important factors in loss of tire mileage.  The chart (Fig.  13) illustrates how an increase in speed from 40 to 50 mph results in 18% loss  in  mileage.    An  increase  of  speed  from  40  to  60  mph results in a 33% mileage loss. Fig.  13.  Speed vs.  Mileage TIRE MATCHING (Dual Tires) Use  care  in  matching  dual  tires.    Tires  which  differ more than 1/4" in diameter or 3/4" in circumference should not be   mounted   on   the   same   dual   wheel.      Should   it   become necessary  to  mount  two  tires  of  unequal  size  on  the  same dual wheel, place the larger or less worn tire on the outside. TIRE MATCHING (Tandem Drive Axles) When mounting tires on tendem drive axles, follow the same instructions as specified for dual tires.  However, never install  the  four  largest  tires  on  one  driving  axle  and  the  four smallest on the other.  This method of tire mounting will cause high lubricant temperatures which may lead to premature axle failures. TIRE REPAIR Methods  for  repairing  tires  will  vary  slightly  with  each manufacturer and it is recommended that the tire manufacturers' procedures be followed if possible.  However, the  procedure  outlined  here  applies  in  general  to  most  tires whether they are light duty or heavy duty. Patching will usually be  satisfactory  for  all  injuries  up  to  3/16"  diameter.    Larger injuries should be handled by spot or section repair methods. The first four steps given here apply to both the hot and cold patch methods. NOTE:  Some tire repair methods for simple punctures do   not   require   the   dismounting   of   tire   from   rim.      These methods should be regarded as temporary fixes since there is a good chance of ply separation and ultimate tire failure can result when puncture plug is installed from the outside. 1. Remove tire and wheel assembly and inflate the tire to the recommended pressure.  Locate the leak and mark with a crayon.  It may be necessary to immerse the tire in water or apply a coat of soapsuds to the tire to locate the leak.  Demount the tire. Probe the injury with an awl (Fig.  14) to remove the puncturing object and foreign material. Fig.  14 Fig.  15 2. Thoroughly clean the inside of the tire around the injury with   rubber   solvent   and   allow   to   dry.      As   a   safety precaution,  solvent  vapors  should  be  blown  out  of  the tire with compressed air.  Solvent is not needed CTS-2032N  Page 6 PRINTED IN UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

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