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DISC WHEELS
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TM-5-4210-230-14P-1 Aerial Ladder Fire Fighting Truck Manual
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Fig.  11.  Chart Showing Effects of Bleeding
TRUCK SERVICE MANUAL TM 5-4210-230-14&P-1 WHEELS, RIMS, TIRES alignment.  See "TORQUE CHART" for correct torque values. After   rim   has   been   properly   torqued,   it   should   be checked for alignment.  This can be accomplished by rotating wheel with a piece of chalk attached to a steady, firm surface and  placed  to  just  barely  clear  outside  surface  of  tire  bead seat.    This  procedure  will  point  out  the  "high  spot".    Keep  in mind, however, that a "high spot" does not necessarily mean that lug nuts have been unevenly tightened.  This condition or misalignment can also result from a bent wheel. WHEEL AND TIRE BALANCING Front  wheel  and  tire  assemblies  must  be  balanced  to prevent  wheel  vibrating  and  bounce.  While  the  correct  front wheel alignment is necessary for easy steering and maximum tire   life,   the   cause   of   unstable   steering   can   be   frequently traced    to    improper    balance    of    front    wheels.    When    this condition   exists,   the   wheel   assembly   should   be   properly balanced. A vulcanized or retreaded tire, or a tire that has a boot in   it,   may   cause   an   unbalanced   condition   that   cannot   be corrected  by  balancing.    In  such  cases  the  tire  should  be replaced before attempting to balance the assembly. Static Balancing A  wheel  out  of  balance  statically  has  a  tendency  to bounce  up  and  down  resulting  in  rapid  tire  wear  in  round  or oblong spots. Static balancing is performed while wheel is stationary by attaching weights to rim flange to offset an opposite heavy point. Static  balancing  may  be  sufficient  in  some  instances where   vehicle   is   operated   only   at   slow   speeds,   however, dynamic  balancing  (in  motion)  balances  the  wheel  and  tire assembly statically as well as dynamically, thereby eliminating vibrations and wheel bounce at both low and high speeds.  NOTE: A wheel may be perfectly bal- anced statically (not in motion) but may still vibrate and bounce  at  high  speed  rotation  because  of  its  being  out  of balance dynamically. Dynamic Balancing Dynamic   balancing   is   complete   wheel   balancing   of which static balancing is only a part. Dynamic balancing (in motion) takes into consideration the  distribution  of  weight  to  be  added  to  the  wheel.    This  is accomplished   by   rapidly   rotating   (normal   truck   operating speed)  the  wheel  and  tire  assembly  either  on  the  vehicle  or with  the  wheel  assembly  removed  and  placed  on  a  dynamic balancing machine.  This determines heavy point on wheel. When the amount of weight required to offset a heavy part in a wheel assembly is known, it is sometimes necessary to attach one-half of the weight to the outside rim flange and the remaining half to the inside rim flange. With   the   weight   properly   distributed   on   the   wheel assembly, the wheel should be in balance both statically and dynamically and should rotate free of vibration and bounce at normal truck operating speeds. TIRE CARE Proper  tire  inflation,  tire  loads,  and  road  speeds  are important determining factors governing tire mileage, and also affect  steering  ease  and  maneuverability.    How  much  these three  factors  affect  tire  wear  is  illustrated  in  the  paragraphs which follow. INFLATION Tire    pressures    should    be    checked    at    regular    and frequent intervals and the pressures maintained to specifications.      Use   an   accurate   tire   pressure   gauge   and check when tires are cool. The chart (Fig..  10) illustrates the loss in tire mileage caused by underinflation.  It will be noted that   a   tire   underinflated   only   20%   will   produce   only   70% normal mileage. Fig.  10.  Inflation vs. Mileage CTS-2032N Page 4

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