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Figure 9-22.  Path of Applicator When Cleaning a Lens
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TM-9-254 Gearcase Transfer M548 M548A1 (
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Marking Optical Components
TM 9-254 9-3. Cleaning Optical Components - Continued (3) Lenses   may   also   be   cleaned   without   removing   them   from   the   cell.      Cleaning   the   component   is accomplished in the same manner as described in (2) above.   Cleaning  of  the  lens  should  start  at  its center and progress to its outer edge.  Move the applicator to the edge of the lens cell and bring it off of the lens.  Care must be taken to prevent leaving marks or streaks on the lens.  Repeat this process on each side of the lens until it is free of dirt and lint. (4) Use  of  the  syringe  and  the  vacuum  system  are  the  most  common  methods  for  removing  dirt  and  lint from the surfaces of lenses and lens cells.  The syringe can be used in most cases, but it may just blow the dirt or lint off the lens and onto some other part of the cell or instrument.  The vacuum system is the most  efficient  for  dirt  removal.    A  vacuum  draws  the  dirt  into  the  system  and  does  not  move  the  dirt around.    Also,  a  suction  adapter  (fig.  9-24)  can  be  used  with  a  vacuum  system  to  hold  lenses  for cleaning.      A   vacuum   system   should   be   supplied   throughout   the   shop   from   a   central   pump   with connections at each individual bench. 9-4. Storing and Handling Optical Components. a. Care.  Optical components should always be handled with extreme care.  Components not handled properly may be damaged to an extent that necessitates regrinding, repolishing, or discarding the component completely. b. Storing  and  Protecting  Components.    Optical  components,  whether  new  or  used  should  be  protected  by keeping them in an out-of-the way place.  A lens tray, with a felt lining on the bottom and a cover over it is a good way to keep  components  from  being  damaged.    This  also  keeps  excessive  dust  from  settling  on  the  components.    Any  time  a component  is  not  going  to  be  used  for  a  period  of  time,  it  should  be  wrapped  in  lens  tissue  and  stored  in  a  protective container. c. Use of Holding Devices.  In cleaning optical components it is sometimes necessary to use holding devices on small thin lenses or reticles.  They should be held with lens tongs equipped with rubber protectors on the jaws to prevent chipping of the lens.  In shops equipped with a central vacuum system, lenses may also be held with a suction cup adapter placed on a vacuum hose as shown in figure 9-24. Figure 9-24.  Suction Cup Adapter Change 2  9-17

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