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Figure 4-46.  Resistance Soldering a Cup Terminal.
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TM-9-254 Gearcase Transfer M548 M548A1 (
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Lapping
TM 9-254 4-19.  Induction Heat Soldering a. General.    The  induction  heat  method  of  soldering  employs  a  principle  of  heat  application  totally  different  from  any conduction  or  convection  process  discussed  earlier.    in  this  method,  heat  is  not  actually  applied  to  the  assembly  to  be soldered, but rather, heat is generated within the assembly itself by exposure to an electromagnetic field. b. Induction Heat Soldering Equipment.  The induction heat soldering equipment consists of the following: (1) A high-frequency generator to produce a high-frequency alternating current. (2) A  water-cooled  metal  coil,  attached  to  the  high-frequency  generator,  to  carry  the  high  frequency  alternating current that produces an electromagnetic field within the coil. c. Uses.  The induction method of soldering is very useful in the soldering of: (1) Large or massive pieces of metal. (2) Small metal parts where it is desired to confine the heat to some particular section of the assembly. (3) Soldering multiple metal assemblies at one time that would become oxidized if heated with a flame or torch. (4) Soldering units where the point of soldering could not be reached by the tip of a soldering iron. (5) Chain soldering, where the parts are placed on an endless belt which travels through the electromagnetic field at a constant rate of speed. d. Advantages.  The main advantages for using induction heat soldering compared to conduction or convection methods are as follows: (1) The metal is quickly and efficiently heated at the exact point where it is needed. (2) The metal does not warp, discolor or oxidize. e. Selecting  Flux.    Select  a  stable  and  fairly  concentrated  flux  which  will  withstand  the  sudden  influx  of  heat  without decomposition.  Concentrated chloride fluxes or resin fluxes are best adapted to induction heat soldering. Section IV.  USE OF ABRASIVES AND FILES 4-20.  Abrasive Processes. a. General.  Processes and materials discussed in this section, use abrasive grains for shaping work pieces.  Abrasive grains are hard crystals either found in nature or manufactured.  The most commonly used materials are aluminum oxide, silicon  carbide  and  diamond.    Other  materials  such  as  garnet,  zirconia,  and  glass  are  used  as  abrasives  for  some applications. 4-49

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