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Figure 4-23.  Electric Soldering Station - Exploded View
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TM-9-254 Gearcase Transfer M548 M548A1 (
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Figure 4-24.  Position of Tip for Maximum Heat Transfer
TM 9-254 4-12. Soldering Station - Continued (2) Plug the cord (11) into the power unit base (7).  Plug power cord (5) into electrical outlet. (3) Turn on power switch (6) and allow soldering tip (3) to heat. (4) Apply water to sponge (9)  and  remove  soldering  iron  (1)  from  iron  holder  (10)  and  wipe  tip  (3)  across sponge to clean off any foreign material. NOTE When soldering electrical parts and wiring, always use a rosin core solder or solid solder with a rosin flux. (5) Rub  rosin  core  solder  over  the  face  of  the  tip  (3).    As  soon  as  the  temperature  rises  sufficiently,  the solder will melt and spread smoothly over the face of the tip.  The purpose of this procedure is to tin the tip as soon as it becomes hot enough to melt solder and before it has had a chance to oxidize. (6) When the tinning is complete, wipe the tip (3) across the sponge (9) while the solder is hot and molten. This will expose an even, almost mirror like layer of molten solder on the tip face. 4-13. Soldering Techniques. a. Using a Soldering Iron.  Soldering can be broken down into seven major steps  which include:  precleaning, applying flux, applying heat, applying solder, cooling, flux removal, and inspection. (1) Precleaning.  The work which is to be soldered must be perfectly clean.  All oxide must be scraped off with  a  steel  scratch  brush,  emery  paper,  steel  wool,  file  or  a  knife,  whichever  works  best  for  the particular job.  Grease, dust, and oil must be removed from surfaces to be soldered with noncorrosive solvents such as trichloroethane, or alcohol. (2) Applying flux.  Flux must wet the entire surface to which the solder is to adhere.  When used, liquid flux must be applied in a thin even coat to the surfaces being joined prior to the application of heat.  When using  cored  solder  wire,  place  solder  in  a  position  that  will  allow  the  flux  to  flow  over  the  joint  as  the solder melts. NOTE o Some electronic components are heat sensitive and could be destroyed by heat.  For this reason, a heat sink device such as surgical tweezers, needle nose pliers, or heat sinks should always be applied between the solder joint and the electronic component. o If  a  soldering  iron  becomes  too  cool  to  solder,  it  is  too  small  for  the  job  and  an  iron with a higher wattage rating or a higher tip temperature should be used. 4-28

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