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DESCRIPTION - TM-5-4210-230-14P-1_994
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TM-5-4210-230-14P-1 Aerial Ladder Fire Fighting Truck Manual
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BELT TENSION
TRUCK SERVICE MANUAL TM 5-4210-230-14&P-1 STEERING GEAR The   high   pressure   discharge   oil   (7)   is   slightly   lower   in pressure  than  the  internal  high  pressure  oil  (1).    The  drop  in pressure  occurs  as  oil  flows  through  the  flow  control  orifice (2).  This reduces the pressure at the bottom end of the pump control   valve   (9)   because   the   orifice   (11)   is   connected   by passage  (8)  to  (9)  resulting  in  a  pressure  unbalance  on  the valve.  The flow control valve moves away from the discharge fitting, but due to the force of the flow control spring (10) the valve remains closed to the bypass hole (5).  The oil pressure does  not  build  up  high  enough  to  cause  the  pressure  relief valve to actuate, because the oil pumped through the steering gear is allowed to recirculate through the entire system. Fig.  4 Slow Cornering Fig. 4  Slow Cornering MODERATE TO HIGH SPEED OPERATION (FIG.  5) When   operating   at   moderate   to   high   speed,   it   is desirable to limit the temperature rise of the oil.  This is done by  flow  controlling.    The  control  valve  in  the  steering  gear  is an open center rotary valve.  When this valve is in the straight ahead  position,  oil  flows  from  the  pump  through  the  open center valve and back to the pump reservoir without traveling through the power steering gear. When this flow exceeds the predetermined   system   requirements,   oil   is   bypassed   within the  pump.  This  is  accomplished  by  the  pressure  drop  which occurs  across  the  flow  control  orifice  (2).    The  pressure  is reduced  at  the  bottom  of  the  flow  control  valve  (9)  because the orifice (11) is connected by (8) to the bottom of valve (9). Fig.  5 Flow Controlling The  pressure  unbalance  of  the  valve  is  sufficient  to overcome  the  force  of  the  spring  (10),  allowing  the  valve  to open  the  bypass  hole  (5),  and  diverting  oil  into  the  intake chamber   (6).   Supercharging   of   the   intake   chamber   occurs under these conditions.  Oil at high velocity discharging past the valve into the intake chamber picks up make-up oil at hole (4) from the reservoir on the jet pump principle.  By reduction of   velocity,   velocity   energy   is   converted   into   supercharge pressure   in   cavity   (6).      During   this   straight   ahead   driving condition,   the   discharge   pressure   should   not   exceed   690 kilopascals (100 PSI). CORNERING AGAINST WHEEL STOPS (FIG.  6) When the steering gear control valve is actuated in either direction to the point of cut-off, the flow of oil from the pump is blocked.  This condition occurs when the front wheels meet the wheel stop, or when the wheel movement is otherwise blocked by a curb or deep sand or mud.  The pump is equipped with a pressure relief valve. The relief valve is contained inside the flow control plunger (13).  When the pressure exceeds a predetermined pressure, (greater than maximum system requirements) the pressure relief ball (14) opens, allowing a small amount of oil to flow into the bypass hole (5).  This flow of oil passing through the pressure relief orifice (11) causes a pressure drop and resulting lower pressure on the bottom end of the control valve (9). CTS-2296R  Chapter 1, Page 7 PRINTED IN UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

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