Quantcast Stress

Order this information in Print

Order this information on CD-ROM

Download in PDF Format

     

Click here to make tpub.com your Home Page

Page Title: Stress
Back | Up | Next

Click here for a printable version

Google


Web
www.tpub.com

Home


   
Information Categories
.... Administration
Advancement
Aerographer
Automotive
Aviation
Combat
Construction
Diving
Draftsman
Engineering
Electronics
Food and Cooking
Math
Medical
Music
Nuclear Fundamentals
Photography
Religion
USMC
   
Products
  Educational CD-ROM's
Printed Manuals
Downloadable Books
   

 

Share on Google+Share on FacebookShare on LinkedInShare on TwitterShare on DiggShare on Stumble Upon
Back
Inertia
Up
TM-5-4210-230-14P-1 Aerial Ladder Fire Fighting Truck Manual
Next
GLOSSARY OF ELECTRONIC TERMS
TRUCK SERVICE MANUAL TM 5-4210-230-14&P-1 GENERAL INFORMATION Elimination   of   the   heavy   place   on   a   crank   shaft   is termed static balancing.  This is accomplished by grinding off portions of the balancing pads forged into both sides of each throw for that purpose. Stress An internal force which resists the destructive action of external  force.    Stresses  are  always  accompanied  by  strains and   deformations   There   are   tensile   stresses,   compressive stresses,  and  shearing  stresses.    At  any  point  on  a  stressed member  the  stress  per  unit  area  is  called  the  "unit  stress". Stress is the force applied, and: Strain Is the resulting deformation. Specific Gravity Is   a   number   indicating   how   many   times   a   certain volume  of  material  is  heavier  than  an  equal  volume  of  water at  a  temperature  of  62°  F.    The  weight  of  one  cubic  inch  of pure water at 62° F. is 0.0361 pound.  If the specific gravity of any   material   is   known,   the   weight   of   a   cubic   inch   of   the material   can,   therefore,   be   determined   by   multiplying   its specific gravity by 0.0361. Tolerance The   range   of   distance   between   specified   limits,   as applied to machine shop practice. Torsion That force with which a twisted part tends to return to a state of rest. Torque Torque   is   that   which   produces   or   tends   to   produce rotation or torsion; the product of tangential force multiplied by the   radius   of   the   part   it   rotates.      An   engine   is,   therefore, essentially  a  device  for  producing  torque,  and  torque  is  the energy available for producing work. Toughness Denotes    a    combination    of    strength    and    ductility, resistance to fatigue, tension and shear. Vapor The gaseous form of substances which are normally in the  solid  or  liquid  state  and  which  can  be  changed  to  these states by increasing pressure or decreasing the temperature. Volatile Readily  vaporizable  (examples:  freon,  ether,  gasoline, alcohol, L.P.  gases, etc.). CTS-2128-L  Page 12 PRINTED IN UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Privacy Statement - Press Release - Copyright Information. - Contact Us - Support Integrated Publishing

Integrated Publishing, Inc.