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TRUCK SERVICE MANUAL TM 5-4210-230-14&P-1 GENERAL INFORMATION Fatigue of Metals The action which takes place in metals causing failure after a large number of applications of stress.  Fatigue failures are characterized by their suddenness and by the absence of general deformation in the piece which fails.  A wire broken by bending   backward   and   forward   is   a   characteristic   fatigue failure. Cause of Fatigue Failure The  cause  of  a  fatigue  failure  may  be  attributed  to  a repetition  of  stresses  which  exceed  the  elastic  limit  of  the steel.  This may be subdivided as follows: Manufacturer's Responsibility 1.  Defective raw material. 2.  Defective heat treatment. 3.  Defective design. 4.  Defective machining. Truck Operator's Responsibility 1.  Overloading. 2.  Overspeeding. 3.  Rough handling and driving. 4.  Road conditions. Fit The different classes of fit of shafts in their holes most generally used are as follows: Shrink Fit-For parts which have to be fitted together by means of an application of heat to expand the hole, at which time  the  shaft  is  inserted.    On  cooling  the  hole  contracts, making   a   perfect   union   which   requires   no   keys   or   other anchors  of  any  kind.    The  bores  are  always  machined  to  a smaller diameter than that of the shaft. Force Fit --For parts which have to be fitted together by means  of  a  press;  they  must  be  keyed  if  they  are  to  be subjected to a twisting force. Driving Fit --For parts which have to be fitted together with     a     soft     hammer,     but     which     can     be     afterwards disassembled. Push Fit --For parts which have to be fitted together by hand  without  special  force,  and  without  having  perceptible shake  when  assembled,  they  should  remain  motionless  in each other. Sliding  Fit  --For  all  parts  which  in  functioning  have  to slide constantly on one another, without turning. Running  Fit  --For  parts  which  in  functioning  have  to revolve  constantly  one  in  the  other,  at  a  medium  speed  and with very little play. Easy   Running   Fit   --Parts   revolving   with   a   relatively large amount of play. Fillet A narrow band of material, frequently in shop practice used to designate a radius on a shaft or other part. Flute The groove cut in taps and reamers to form the cutting edge and allow room for chips. Friction Is the resistance to motion which takes place when one body  is  moved  upon  another,  and  is  generally  defined  as "That force which acts between two bodies at their surface of contact, so as to resist their sliding on each other." Gauge or Gage Master,  Standard  or  Reference;  terms  applying  to  a nearly perfect gauge used for calibration of working gauges. Gauge -Limit A gauge having two sizes, the difference between them representing  the  tolerance  or  allowable  variation.    One  size must  go  into  or  over  the  work  being  checked,  and  the  other size must not go.  These gauges are frequently referred to in shop practice as "tolerance gauges" and as "go" and "no go" gauges. CTS-2128-L  Page 9 PRINTED IN UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

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