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Fig.  3  Starting Motor Circuit
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TM-5-4210-230-14P-1 Aerial Ladder Fire Fighting Truck Manual
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DISASSEMBLY - TM-5-4210-230-14P-1_622
TRUCK SERVICE MANUAL TM 5-4210-230-14&P-1 ELECTRICAL Grounded Side:  High resistance in ground circuit of starting  motor  system  will  result  in  hard  starting  and  may affect the charging circuit as well. Connect voltmeter leads to ground on starting motor and to ground post of battery.  The allowable voltage drop of .2 volt is permissible.  If more than .2 volt is obtained, a poor ground  is  present,  such  as  a  loose  starting  motor  mounting bolt,  bad  battery  ground  connector  or  ground  connection  to engine or frame depending upon the battery installation.  The excessive  voltage  drop  is  located  in  much  the  same  manner as in the preceding test working toward the battery. Control Circuit:  High  resistance  in  the  control  circuit will  reduce  the  current  flow  through  the  solenoid  windings, which  can  cause  improper  function  of  solenoid  or  not  at  all. Improper functioning of the solenoid could result in burning of contacts in the solenoid causing high resistance in the starting motor circuit. To  complete  control  circuit  test,  check  the  vehicle circuit  diagram  to  assist  in  locating  the  wires  and  particular switches    involved    in    the    chassis.        Observe    polarity    of voltmeter   and   connect   leads   to   battery   post   and   solenoid switch terminal as shown in Fig.  5.  Crank engine using the vehicle  ignition  switch  or  push  button,  if  equipped,  observing the voltmeter reading.  If the voltmeter shows less than .5 volt, the circuit is in good condition.  If more than .5 volt, this is an indication of excessive resistance.  However, with experience, slightly higher voltage loss will be found and will be normal. Fig.  5  Control Circuit Test Isolate  the  point  of  high  resistance  by  placing  the voltmeter leads across each component in the circuit in turn. A reading of more than.  volt across any one wire or switch is usually an indication of the trouble. Test No.  4 -- No Load Test After  completing  the  cranking  voltage  test,  battery capacity  test  and  voltage  drop  tests,  and  the  starting  motor still fails to function, remove the motor and make the no load test as follows. Note    that    the    preceding    tests    were    made    in    a particular order to make certain the starting motor circuit is in good condition before needless starting motor removal. Before  performing  "No  Load  Test,  T"  look  the  motor over.    The  pinion  should  be  checked  to  be  sure  it  is  free  by turning   it   on   the   screw   shaft.      The   armature   should   be checked so that it is free to rotate by prying the pinion with a screw driver.  Tight bearing, bent armature shaft or loose pole shoe screw could cause the armature not to turn freely.  The motor  should  be  disassembled  if  the  armature  does  not  turn freely.    However,  if  the  armature  will  rotate  freely,  the  next step is to give the motor a no load test before disassembly. Connect   the   starting   motor   in   series   with   a   fully charged battery of the specified voltage, an ammeter capable of     reading     several     hundred     amperes,     and     a     variable resistance.  Also connect a voltmeter as illustrated in Fig.  6 from   the   motor   terminal   to   the   motor   frame.      An   RPM indicator  is  necessary  to  measure  armature  speed.    Obtain the specified voltage by varying the resistance unit; then read the current draw and the armature speed and compare these readings with the values listed in the specifications. Fig.  6  No Load Test Hookup CTS-2258-K  Page 6 PRINTED IN UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

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