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Fig.    11 Sequence in Securing Brake Lining to Shoe
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TM-5-4210-230-14P-1 Aerial Ladder Fire Fighting Truck Manual
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REMACHINING ROTORS
TRUCK SERVICE MANUAL TM 5-4210-230-14&P-1 BRAKES-HYDRAULIC and drum surface.  Grind new lining approximately 1.78 mm (.070 in.) less than the inside diameter of brake drum.  Make certain that the brake is fully released before grinding. DISC BRAKES INSPECTION OF ROTORS Inspect   rotors   for   lateral   runout,   parallelism,   (Fig. 14), cracks or burnt marks. The disc brakes may have a slight amount of runout or wobble due to tolerances which are required in machining the large flat surfaces of the rotor. Fig.  14   Rotor Lateral Runout Lateral runout is the movement of the rotor from side to side as   it   rotates.      Excessive   runout   causes   the   rotor   faces   to knock back the disc pads and can result in chatter, excessive pedal  travel,  pumping  or  fighting  pedal  and  vibration  during the  braking  action.    This  condition  can  be  due  to  a  warped rotor,    loose    wheel    bearing    and,    especially    if    symptoms develop  immediately  after  sharp  turns,  deflection  in  steering or suspension. Runout is measured by a dial indicator SE1848 (Fig.  15) set against the rotor surface approximately 25.4 mm (1 in.) from outer  edge  of  rotor.    Runout  should  not  exceed  .105  mm  (. 004  in.)  Excessive  runout  will  kick  back  the  shoes,  cause  an increase in pedal travel needed to apply the brakes, and pedal vibration will be felt during applications.  It also contributes to "grab", "pull" and noise problems. Do  not  overlook  wheel  bearing  adjustment.  Wheel  bearings which are loose can cause excessive runout indication. If  rotor  runout  exceeds  .105  mm  (.004  in.)  either  refacing  or new rotor assembly will be required. Fig.   15 Dial Indicator Installation Fig.  16  Rotor Not Satisfactory for Service Rotors should be inspected for parallelism. Parallelism  refers  to  the  amount  of  variation  in  thickness'  of the rotor (Fig.  17). Fig.    17  Rotor Parallelism or Variation In Thickness CTS-2779  Page 7 PRINTED IN UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

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