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CHAPTER II BRAKE DRUMS
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TM-5-4210-230-14P-1 Aerial Ladder Fire Fighting Truck Manual
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CHAPTER  III RIMS AND TIRES
TRUCK SERVICE MANUAL TM 5-4210-230-14&P-1 WHEELS, RIMS, TIRES Fig.  4 emery  or  steel  wool  particles  from  drum  after  this  operation. More   heavily   damaged   or   out-of-round   drums   should   be ground or turned on brake drum lathe. If depth of scoring, bellmouth or barrel shaping exceeds .13 mm (.005"), measured with micrometer across part or all of brake surface, drum should be refinished.  Reboring limits (see drum) must not be exceeded and no heat checks, cracks or bluing is evident. Use  a  micrometer  also  to  check  for  an  out-of-round drum.        Make    check    by    measuring    drum    brake    surface diameter  at  various  points,  45°   apart  around  circumference. Eccentricity (out-of-round) should not exceed .38 mm (.015") on diameter. For older brake drums which do not show a maximum diameter   the   drum   must   be   discarded   when   diameter   is 3.05mm (.120") over original diameter. Remember that each time brake drums are turned, less metal   remains   to   absorb   the   heat   developed   by   braking action.  Brake  drums  containing  less  metal  will  operate  at  a higher  temperature.    As  a  result,  brake  fade,  slow  recovery and erratic wear will be more noticeable.  Also, extremely high temperatures  shorten  lining  life  and  cause  heat  checks  and cracks   (Fig.      5)   form   on   inner   surface   of   drums.      These conditions will become progressively worse until finally drums fail. Fig.  5 To  recondition  a  brake  drum  in  a  lathe  (Fig.    6),  the drum must be mounted so that it is centered.  Use proper size cone  to  provide  accurate  centering.    Turn  drum,  taking  only light cuts and remove just enough material to clean up drum. Then  grind  the  finished  surface  if  grinder  is  available  or  use emery cloth on a straight piece of wood and polish the drum friction surface. NOTE:      Brake   drums   that   are   otherwise   in good   condition   can   be   turned   in   a   lathe. However, it must be remembered that recommended   rebore   limit   for   brake   drums over  35.6  cm  (14")  in  diameter  must  not  be increased more than 2.03 mm (.080") diameter (total cut) and discarded at 3.05 mm (.120") over normal diameter. Brake   drums   should   be   cleaned   thoroughly   with   a steam cleaner or hot water. Do not use a solvent which leaves an oily residue.  If inspection shows the drums may be used without remachining, rub friction surface with fine emery cloth or  sandpaper  to  remove  any  foreign  deposits.    If  drum  has been   reconditioned,   clean   friction   surface   with   fine   emery cloth or sandpaper and wash.  Next examine very carefully to see that no metal chips remain in drum. Fig.  6 CTS-2032N  Page 2 PRINTED IN UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

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