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Section XIV. LUBRICATION SYSTEM
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TM-5-4210-205-12 Truck Fire Fighting; Powered Pumper; Foam and Water 500 G.M.P.; Centrifugal Pump Power Take Off Driven; 400 Gal. Water Tank 40 Gal. Manual
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Figure 71. Placement of charges.
CHAPTER 4
DEMOLITION OF FIRE TRUCK TO PREVENT ENEMY USE
138. Demolition by Explosives or Weapons Fire
136. General
a.
Explosives. Place as many of the charges
When capture or abandonment of the fire truck to
an enemy is imminent, the responsible unit commander
shown on figure 71 as the situation permits and detonate
must make the decision either to destroy the equipment
them simultaneously with a detonating cord and suitable
or to render it inoperative.  Based on this decision,
detonator.
orders are issued which cover the desired extent of
(1)
One 1/2-pound charge between the
destruction.
Whatever  method  of  demolition  is
generator and cylinder block.
employed, it is essential to destroy the same vital parts
of all fire trucks, and all corresponding repair parts.
(2)
One 1/2-pound charge between the
starting motor and flywheel housing.
137. Demolition to Render Equipment Inoperative
(3)
One 1/2-pound charge between fire
a.
Mechanical Means. Use sledge hammers,
pump and primer pump.
crowbars, picks, axes, or other heavy tools that may be
available, together with the tools normally included with
(4)
One 1/2-pound charge on each hose
the fire truck, to destroy the following:
reel.
(1)
Engine accessories.
(5)
One 1/2-pound charge on water tank.
(2)
Fuel tank.
b.
Weapons Fire. Fire on the fire truck with
the heaviest suitable weapons available.
(3)
Controls and instruments.
139. Other Demolition Methods
Note. The above steps are minimum
requirements for this method.
a.
Scattering and Concealment.  Remove all
easily accessible parts, such as fuel pump, fuel filters,
b.
Misuse.  Perform the following steps to
oil filter, air cleaner, and batteries. Scatter them through
render the fire truck inoperative.
dense foliage, bury them in the ground, or throw them in
a lake, stream, or other body of water.
(1)
Drain the engine crankcase.
b.
Burning.  Pack rags, clothing, or canvas
(2)
Throw sand, mud, and other foreign substances
around the engine, pump and control panels. Saturate
into the oil filter openings and engine crankcase.
this packing with gasoline, oil, or diesel fuel and ignite.
(3)
Drain the cooling system.
c.
Submersion. Totally submerge the fire truck
(4)
Cut the drive belts.
in a body of water, if possible, to provide some water
damage and concealment.  Salt water will do greater
(5)
Drain the water pump transmission.
damage to metal parts than fresh water.
(6)
Drain the primer pump oil tank.
140. Training
(7)
Throw dirt or sand into the radiator and fuel tank.
All operators should receive thorough training in
(8)
Operate the engine and fire pump at full speed
the destruction of the fire truck (FM 5-25). Simulated
until failure occurs.
destruction, using all of the methods listed above,
should be included in the operator training, that
Note. The above steps are minimum
demolition operations are usually necessitated by
requirements for this method.
TAGO 6839A
97

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